Getting Started with Async/Await in iOS

Photo by Matt Duncan on Unsplash

When working with asynchronous code we often leverage the use of callbacks so we can execute code when the asynchronous operation finishes. This works fine in simple scenarios but gets complicated if we have to perform a future request based on the result of the previous request. The callback pattern also open doors for not remembering to execute the user interface code on the main thread, which can lead to performance…

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iOS Developer, speaker and educator. Top Udemy and LinkedIn instructor. Lead instructor at DigitalCrafts. https://www.udemy.com/user/mohammad-azam-2/

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Mohammad Azam

Mohammad Azam

iOS Developer, speaker and educator. Top Udemy and LinkedIn instructor. Lead instructor at DigitalCrafts. https://www.udemy.com/user/mohammad-azam-2/

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